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RSS Blog: Chaordic Concordance

A mildly amusing debate of sorts about blogging broke out among bloggers over the Thanksgiving Day week-end in the U.S.

A mildly amusing debate of sorts about blogging broke out among bloggers over the Thanksgiving Day week-end in the U.S., no doubt prompted in part by a broadside against bloggers in a recent issue of Forbes magazine.

Full disclosure: I spoke with the Forbes reporter in question, Dan Lyons, back in February about as aspect of the story he was developing, although thankfully he didn't use me as a source for the final story, thus helping to spare the reputation of his magazine and my family.

In any case, the word "chaordic" popped up during the week-end blogging discussion, thrown about with an effulgent  elan transmogrifying quotidian pomposity. In other words, quoting Mike Nomad: "what th'?"

Despite an appearance that apparently belies and ancient Greek pedigree, the word "chaordic" was apparently coined by a "visionary" at Visa International, who saw in organized chaos, or chaotic organization, "chaordic" patterns that could be exploited for the greater good of the American credit addiction and the world economy.

The word is now used to describe the salubrious effects that can arise from the chaos of millions of bloggers blasting away at their keyboards, each trying to get his or her voice above the din, for the greater good of the blosophere, cyberspace, and the world.

The blogosphere has proven, in its early days, as an almost invaluable counterweight against the calcified, obtuse pomposity of established media reporters and columnists. It also acts as an accelerator--and therefore, effective debunker--of emerging urban legends, gossip, and innuendo. It also keeps a lot of people, including me, off the streets.

Cathartic, yes. Amusing, definitely. Providing long-term value to the human species, could be.

But "chaordic?" As Nietzsche wrote, "out of chaos, comes order." Or as Mel Brooks wrote, commenting on a character of his pretentiously quoting Nietszche,  "Oh, blow it out your a--, Howard!"

My sentiments exactly. Chaordic indeed.

posted Saturday, 26 November 2005 9:45 PM EST

More Stories By Roger Strukhoff

Roger Strukhoff (@IoT2040) is Executive Director of the Tau Institute for Global ICT Research, with offices in Illinois and Manila. He is Conference Chair of @CloudExpo & @ThingsExpo, and Editor of SYS-CON Media's CloudComputing BigData & IoT Journals. He holds a BA from Knox College & conducted MBA studies at CSU-East Bay.

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LinuxWorld News Desk 11/26/05 11:02:30 PM EST

'Oh, blow it out your a--, Howard!' My sentiments exactly. Chaordic indeed.